National Honey Week celebrates all things beekeeping, from our 'liquid gold' runny and set to cut comb honey, beeswax, mead and everything in between!

The results from the BBKA’s annual honey survey will be unveiled during this week and, at the end of the week, from the 25th – 27th October, the National Honey Show will be taking place at Sandown Racecourse in Esher, Surrey.

Jonathan Farber

A good beekeeper will always ensure that a colony of bees has more than enough honey for its needs, usually around 30 lbs or 13 kilos, and only take what can be spared.

The honey crop is considered an indicator of the state of the natural world. For example, a poor honey crop could suggest bad weather, a lack of forage or a weakness in the honey bee colony, which is why the results to the BBKA Honey Survey are of such national interest.

The BBKA invites members of the public to help honey bees by buying local honey, planting flowers providing nectar and pollen which honey bees can eat, or, to join its fundraising scheme Adopt a Beehive.


To be sent details of the BBKA annual honey survey, published during Honey Week please contact: BBKA press officer, Diane Roberts, Mobile: 07841 625797

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The National Honey Show (25th - 27th October)

http://www.honeyshow.co.uk/

On the Thursday there are morning lectures running before the show opens officially at 12 noon to offer interest while traders are still setting up and judging is taking place. 

On Friday there is the programme of main lectures and the series of Bee Craft lectures from young bee research scientists from UK universities.

Alongside our Saturday lecture programme which focuses on front line (cutting edge?) research presented by world renowned beekeepers, there is a very popular series of lectures on beekeeping aimed at the newer beekeeper and those thinking of taking up this absorbing and rewarding hobby. This year these will consist of informal lecture/talks by Lynfa Davies (Welsh Beekeepers), Anne Rowberry (Avon Beekeepers), Bob Smith (Kent Beekeepers) and Roger Patterson (Sussex Beekeepers).

Putting on this incredible show each year takes a lot of time and enthusiasm from the large team of volunteers. It also needs a sizeable zap of financial input, to which end your membership, entry fees, the trade hall and all our sponsors make the most incredible and valuable contribution. If you can help in any way it would be much appreciated. Some Local Associations helped last year by sponsoring lectures, and their members were delighted to see their Association acknowledged in the Show Schedule. If your association would like to help in this way, do ask us for the list. You could sponsor a main lecture, make a smaller contribution to sponsoring one of the beginners lectures, or maybe a workshop or entry class. All most welcome.