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British Beekeepers Association

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Press Officer Diane Roberts 07841 625797

21st​ ​September​ ​2017 The​ ​BBKA​ ​has​ ​announced​ ​the​ ​winners​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Bees​ ​in​ ​Art​ ​Competiton​ ​2017. Jamilla Bullock, aged 9, from Tockington near Bristol and artist Julia Kerrison from the South West won with their beautiful and striking bee images. They will each receive a commemorative plate printed with their winning pictures.
The latest newsletter from BBKA Vice Chairman Margaret Wilson is full of interesting stuff about new exams and how well the current entrants did. It also explains how events at the next Spring Convention will be colour coded so you can work out which session suits your level of beekeeping experience.
The BBKA has launched a new JustGiving campaign to raise £2000 to get schools skilled in beekeeping. The money raised will be used to give 80 Junior schools or 40 senior schools the chance to join our new schools membership scheme.
A study from University of Warwick says with the build up of Asian Hornets in Northern Europe another invasion is inevitable. It says, without action, hornets could be widespread in the UK in 20 years. The paper, in Nature's Scientific Reports, calls on beekeepers to be vigilant and make sure every siting is reported.
Filed under: Asian Hornet, BBKA News
The Worshipful Company of Wax Chandlers has donated the last bit of money needed to ensure that the British Beekeeper’s Association (BBKA) can stage the International Meeting of Young Beekeepers (IMYB) in July. Master Peter Tompkins handed a cheque for £8,000 to BBKA President John Hendrie at the Spring Convention Dinner. The opening ceremony of the IMYB takes place at Marlborough College in Wiltshire on 6th July. It will feature the Biosecurity Minister, Lord Gardiner, as well as Peter Tompkins.
The nation’s smartphones are the latest weapon in the fight to prevent the spread of the Asian hornet, thanks to a new app which has been launched. People will be able to use the free app - called Asian hornet watch - to quickly and easily report possible sightings of the invasive species and send pictures of suspect insects to experts at the National Bee Unit.
An outbreak of Asian hornets has been successfully contained by bee inspectors who promptly tracked down and destroyed their nest in Gloucestershire. Asian hornets were first discovered in the Tetbury area in September, but the National Bee Unit moved swiftly to find the nest and remove it. No further live Asian hornets have been seen since the nest was treated with pesticide and removed in early October. Two dead Asian hornets were discovered in separate locations close by in north Somerset, but no nests or live hornets have been located by inspectors and there have been no further sightings.
Inspectors from the National Bee Unit say they have only found Asian hornets at 6 sites within 500 metres of the original discovery of one of these hornets in Tetbury in Gloucestershire. The search for the nest continues.